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The price of peace : money, democracy, and the life of John Maynard Keynes / Zachary D. Carter.

The price of peace : money, democracy, and the life of John Maynard Keynes / Zachary D. Carter.
In the spring of 1934, Virginia Woolf sketched an affectionate three-page biographical fantasy of her great friend, John Maynard Keynes, attempting to encompass no less than 25 themes, which she jotted down at its opening: Politics. Art. Dancing. Letters. Economics. Youth. The Future. Glands. Genealogies. Atlantis. Mortality. Religion. Cambridge. Eton. The Drama. Society. Truth. Pigs. Sussex. The History of England. America. Optimism. Stammer. Old Books. Hume. In truth, his life contained even more. Years earlier, as a young Cambridge philosopher and economist, Keynes spent his days moving between government service and academia, and when he was called up to the Treasury on the eve of World War I, he relished an opportunity to save the empire. He worked dutifully, but as the aftermath of the war and the disastrous Versailles Treaty unfolded, with its harsh demands for German reparations, Keynes saw how the strain on its citizens might encourage would-be authoritarians. The experience began a career that spanned two world wars and a global depression and which often found him in a Cassandra-like position, arguing against widely accepted ideas that he saw as outdated or dangerous. His influential ideas made it to America and FDR's New Deal in the Great Depression, and through his books, especially The General Theory, he became a founding giant in the economics profession. Even as his star rose, however, the most important allegiance of Keynes's life was to writers and artists. He valued his membership in the iconic Bloomsbury Group above any position, and he forever envied the talents of his friends like Virginia Woolf and Lytton Strachey, often providing them with much needed financial support as the most gainfully employed member of the group. In return, they gave him a moral compass and inspired his vision of what society should be--


The planter of modern life : Louis Bromfield and the seeds of a food revolution / Stephen Heyman.

The planter of modern life : Louis Bromfield and the seeds of a food revolution / Stephen Heyman.
How a literary idol of the Lost Generation launched America's organic and sustainable food movement. In interwar France, Louis Bromfield was equally famous as a writer and as a gardener. He pruned dahlias with Edith Wharton, weeded Gertrude Stein's vegetable patch, and fed the starving artists who flocked to his farmhouse outside Paris. His best-selling novels earned him a Pulitzer-and the jealousy of friends like Ernest Hemingway. But his radical approach to the soil has aged better than his books, inspiring a wave of farmers, foodies, and chefs to rethink how they should grow and consume their food. In 1938, Bromfield returned to his native Ohio, an expat novelist now reinvented as the squire of 1,000-acre Malabar Farm. Transplanting ideas from India and Europe, he created a mecca for forward- thinking agriculturalists and a rural retreat for celebrities like Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall (who were married there in 1945). Bromfield's untold story is a fascinating history of people and places-and of deep-rooted concerns about the environment and its ability to sustain our most basic needs and pleasures--


 

 

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